hadrian6:

Hercules at the Feet of Omphale. 1912. Gustave Claude Etienne Courtois. French 1853-1923. oil/canvas.
http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

hadrian6:

Hercules at the Feet of Omphale. 1912. Gustave Claude Etienne Courtois. French 1853-1923. oil/canvas.

http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

(via mythologer)

wiccateachings:

Happy Earth Day 2014! Lets show some love to Mother Nature. Make everyday Earth Day. More details about Earth Day. http://www.earthday.org/

wiccateachings:

Happy Earth Day 2014! Lets show some love to Mother Nature. Make everyday Earth Day. 

More details about Earth Day. http://www.earthday.org/

birdandmoon:

Whew, done! Here’s a poster of western North American bird sound mnemonics. This one and my eastern one are in my store. Original is on my site here.

birdandmoon:

Whew, done! Here’s a poster of western North American bird sound mnemonics. This one and my eastern one are in my store. Original is on my site here.

(via rhamphotheca)

skeletal:

FIGURES OF LORE | ma gu, chinese mythology    ↳ requested by anon

Ma Gu (Chinese: 麻姑; pinyin: Mágū; Wade–Giles: Ma Ku; literally “Hemp Maid”) is a legendary Taoist xian (仙 “immortal; transcendent”) associated with the elixir of life, and she is a symbolic protector of females, in Chinese mythology. Stories in Chinese literature describe Ma Gu as a beautiful young woman with long birdlike fingernails, while early myths associate her with caves. Ma Gu xian shou (麻姑獻壽 “Ma Gu gives her birthday greetings”) is a popular motif in Chinese art.
Ma Gu’s name compounds two common Chinese words: ma “cannabis; hemp” and gu “aunt; maid”.
Ma (the modern Chinese character 麻, which derives from a Zhou Dynasty bronze script ideograph, shows 林 “plants” drying in a 广 “shed; shack”) originally meant “hemp, Cannabis sativa”. Cannabis has been continuously cultivated in China since Neolithic times (Li 1974:437); for example, hemp cords were used to create the characteristic line designs on Yangshao culture pottery and the fibres were used to produce cloth prior to the introduction of cotton. Ma has extended meanings of “numbed; tingling” (e.g., mazui 麻醉 “anesthetic; narcotic”), “pockmarked; pitted” (mazi 麻子 “hemp seed; pockmark”), “sesame” (zhima 芝麻), and an uncommon Chinese surname.
Translating Ma Gu into English is problematic, depending upon whether her name is interpreted as a “maid”, “priestess”, or “goddess” of “hemp”, “marijuana”, or something else. Victor H. Mair (1990) proposed that Chinese wu (巫 “shaman”), pronounced *myag in Old Chinese, was a loanword from Old Persian *maguš “magician; magi”, which is hypothetically comparable with Ma Gu.

skeletal:

FIGURES OF LORE | ma guchinese mythology
    ↳ requested by anon

Ma Gu (Chinese: 麻姑; pinyin: Mágū; Wade–Giles: Ma Ku; literally “Hemp Maid”) is a legendary Taoist xian (仙 “immortal; transcendent”) associated with the elixir of life, and she is a symbolic protector of females, in Chinese mythology. Stories in Chinese literature describe Ma Gu as a beautiful young woman with long birdlike fingernails, while early myths associate her with caves. Ma Gu xian shou (麻姑獻壽 “Ma Gu gives her birthday greetings”) is a popular motif in Chinese art.

Ma Gu’s name compounds two common Chinese words: ma “cannabis; hemp” and gu “aunt; maid”.

Ma (the modern Chinese character 麻, which derives from a Zhou Dynasty bronze script ideograph, shows 林 “plants” drying in a 广 “shed; shack”) originally meant “hemp, Cannabis sativa”. Cannabis has been continuously cultivated in China since Neolithic times (Li 1974:437); for example, hemp cords were used to create the characteristic line designs on Yangshao culture pottery and the fibres were used to produce cloth prior to the introduction of cotton. Ma has extended meanings of “numbed; tingling” (e.g., mazui 麻醉 “anesthetic; narcotic”), “pockmarked; pitted” (mazi 麻子 “hemp seed; pockmark”), “sesame” (zhima 芝麻), and an uncommon Chinese surname.

Translating Ma Gu into English is problematic, depending upon whether her name is interpreted as a “maid”, “priestess”, or “goddess” of “hemp”, “marijuana”, or something else. Victor H. Mair (1990) proposed that Chinese wu (巫 “shaman”), pronounced *myag in Old Chinese, was a loanword from Old Persian *maguš “magician; magi”, which is hypothetically comparable with Ma Gu.

Ma Gu

Ma Gu

llbwwb:

(via 500px / - by Saeed al alawi)

Tags: deer animals cute

lacigreen:

callmekitto:

ijustwanttobeadisneyvillain:

healthycollegeliving:

yummy-recovery:

oatsandyoga:

drink-green-tea-x:

later-is-never:

i’m so happy this set of pictures exists. I’M NOT ALONE!

Every day ):

Congrats, you’re human :))
No but seriously, imagine if you digestive system couldn’t expand to accomodate food? You’d be in terrible pain every time you eat and would have to consume little quantities of liquid all day long to get your nutrition. 

this.

I need reminding sometimes.

no but you don’t even understand how much this needed to be done

THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT TO KNOW! You are a human who accommodates for the nutrients you need to survive! how wonderful! please don’t be scared or ashamed of that! 

^ AHHHHHH BELLIES R SO GR8

lacigreen:

callmekitto:

ijustwanttobeadisneyvillain:

healthycollegeliving:

yummy-recovery:

oatsandyoga:

drink-green-tea-x:

later-is-never:

i’m so happy this set of pictures exists. I’M NOT ALONE!

Every day ):

Congrats, you’re human :))

No but seriously, imagine if you digestive system couldn’t expand to accomodate food? You’d be in terrible pain every time you eat and would have to consume little quantities of liquid all day long to get your nutrition. 

this.

I need reminding sometimes.

no but you don’t even understand how much this needed to be done

THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT TO KNOW! You are a human who accommodates for the nutrients you need to survive! how wonderful! please don’t be scared or ashamed of that! 

^ AHHHHHH BELLIES R SO GR8

(via kiotsukatanna)

phobiawitch:

Anyone else use Technology on their Altar?

(via egyptianwitchcraft)

Athena-Neith represented as a child, wearing the crested helm, holding the spear in Her left hand and a statue of Serapis in Her right. (1st century CE, from the Faiyum, Egypt; now in the Israel Museum)

Athena-Neith represented as a child, wearing the crested helm, holding the spear in Her left hand and a statue of Serapis in Her right. (1st century CE, from the Faiyum, Egypt; now in the Israel Museum)

quiet-hippie:

aawwwweee

quiet-hippie:

aawwwweee

(Source: octaedr)

archaicwonder:

Rare Canaanite Snake Shrine, Late Bronze Age, c. 1550 - 1200 BC

This remarkable and rare object is a Bronze-Age snake shrine from ancient Canaan. It bears a superficial resemblance to a Chalcolithic funerary urn but it in fact a devotional piece which reflects a cultic affiliation to snakes which is technically known as ophiolatry. It is shaped in the form of a long barrel vault, sealed at one end and open at the other. The open end is surrounded by a quadrangular façade which is considerably taller than the main body of the piece. Unlike the body, which is plain, the portions of the façade above and below the entrance are decorated with a series of curvilinear, serpentine designs that frame the doorway (four above and one beneath).

The precise function of these pieces is not clearly understood, but there are indications that they contained an actual snake and/or offrenda dedicated to them, in a religious/ritual setting such as a chapel or perhaps prosperous domestic setting. The ancient populations of the Middle East and Northern Africa believed snakes to be sacred and holy due to their apparent immortality in shedding their skins and emerging ‘reborn’. As a result, various cults and devotional institutions dedicated to snakes sprang up from Mesopotamia to Canaan, as well as further afield in Crete and even Nubia, where the tradition is believed to have originated. Materials dedicated to this practice of worship have been found at many sites, notably including Megiddo, Shechem and Hazor. Later incarnations of the faith have been found in northern Syria (Hittite), at the Assyrian site of Tepe Gawra and also in 6th century BC Babylon.

The Canaanites were one of the ‘tribal’ groups of what was to become Israel, Palestine and Jordan, who had their cultural roots in the Neolithic revolution when agriculture revolutionized Near East economics. By the Bronze Age the stability of the area and their position between great trading powers – notably Egypt and Mesopotamia – made them prosperous and culturally diverse, and was a high point for artistic creation. The culture contracted with economic issues suffered by Egypt and the Mesopotamians, and went through a collapse at the end of the Bronze Age due to a combination of ‘Sea People’ invasions, environmental meltdown and internal troubles in Egypt leading to loss of infrastructure throughout the Near East. Their resurgence of power in the Iron Age was matched by that of the Ammonites and Moabites, among others, and the region eventually came under control of the Neo-Assyrians by the mid 8th century BC.

(Source: baidun.com)

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge,
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge,

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”

Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

(Source: girlboxing.org, via norma-bara)

The Traveling Magic Ritual Kit is a portable nemeton. – The Druid’s Hallows tiles are four game-board quality, double-sided tiles symbolizing the Fire, Well and Blessing. They are meant to be the ‘altar’ for your own small well, fire-candle and blessing-glass Careful use should allow the tiles to serve for a long while. The twelve Temple Image cards provide ready images of the World-Tree, the Gate and the key gods of the rites provided. These can be stood upright, to create a temple atmosphere in small. The tiles serve as ‘altars’ for the simple candle and water-bowl of a travel-altar, (not provided in the kit… I’ll say that again, too…)  adding color and symbolism to a dresser-top or coffee-table.  Along with the basic Blessing Altar cards the set includes twelve blank spell-cards and a Conjuring Tile along with instruction and resources for arranging them for personal spellwork.

The Traveling Magic Ritual Kit is a portable nemeton. – The Druid’s Hallows tiles are four game-board quality, double-sided tiles symbolizing the Fire, Well and Blessing. They are meant to be the ‘altar’ for your own small well, fire-candle and blessing-glass Careful use should allow the tiles to serve for a long while. The twelve Temple Image cards provide ready images of the World-Tree, the Gate and the key gods of the rites provided. These can be stood upright, to create a temple atmosphere in small. The tiles serve as ‘altars’ for the simple candle and water-bowl of a travel-altar, (not provided in the kit… I’ll say that again, too…)  adding color and symbolism to a dresser-top or coffee-table.  Along with the basic Blessing Altar cards the set includes twelve blank spell-cards and a Conjuring Tile along with instruction and resources for arranging them for personal spellwork.